Browsing From the desk of Fr. Tharp

January 5, 2020 - THE EPIPHANY OF THE LORD

Jan 14, 2020

Infant Pre-Baptism

 

The pre-baptism class for first time parents or parents from St. Ann or Sacred Heart who have not gone through a pre-baptism program at another parish will take place at 8:00 p.m. on Monday, January 13, 2020 in the basement of Sacred Heart Church.  The class takes less than forty-five minutes and provides answers for questions you may or may not have thought about. If you already went through the class for your first child, there is no need to repeat the class; just call Fr. Tharp (513) 858-4260 to schedule the baptism.

 

Information for Federal Income Tax

 

Now that we have closed the books for 2019 at both St. Ann and Sacred Heart, we will be working to issue the statement of donations as soon as possible; almost certainly before the end of January.  If you have a filing date earlier than April 15, and need this information sooner, please call the parish office and we will seek to expedite your statement.

 

Upcoming Confirmations

 

The Administration of the Sacrament of Confirmation will take place at St. Ann on Tuesday, February 4.   There will be no confessions at Sacred Heart on Tuesday, February 4.  Confirmation for Sacred Heart will take place on Wednesday, March 4, 2020.  

 

Reflection on Scripture

 

The Epiphany of the Lord is the celebration of the universality of the message of Jesus Christ.  In Chapter Ten of the Book of Genesis we see the progeny of Noah as three sons: Shem, Ham, and Japheth.  The story suggests that all the nations and races of humanity after the flood come from these three. In Matthew’s Gospel (chapter two) he references Magi from the east arriving in Jerusalem.  Matthew does not say there are three of them, but since there are three gifts, the presumption is there are three Magi. Gold is the symbol of Christ’s messianic kingship. Frankincense is the symbol of his divinity.  Myrrh is symbolic of his sacrificial death. Symbolically the three sons of Noah are represented as all humanity, every race and nation, coming to acknowledge that Christ is the Son of God, the king of the universe, and savior of the world.  Matthew tells us that Jesus is the culmination of the hopes of all human beings. Jesus is God incarnate.  

 

In a real way, the Epiphany points out the theological concept of the “hypostatic union.”  Jesus is fully God (divine) and yet fully human. God incarnate therefore dies on the cross to be the “only way” to salvation.  

 

Next Weekend: Baptism of the Lord

    

Is 42:1-4, 6-7

Acts 10:34-38

Mt 3:13-17

 

Theme:  Ordinary Time

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